The Saga Continues…

In 2012 an independent comic entered the scene, simply titled Saga. Which I discovered in 2014 – and it rocked my world….

Well, okay, nothing quite so dramatic, but it did jump to the very top of my Favorite Comics list right then and there, forcing a reluctant Superior Spider-Man to a close but still second position. So, what’s that all about? Continue reading

Superior Spider-Man, issue #… 32?!

Back in May I was still lamenting the fact that Dan Slott’s Superior Spider-Man had ended after only 31 issues. It had been a truly awesome run, with an ending in which Doc Ock hands the webslinger’s spandex back to Peter Parker – facilitating a smooth transition into the new Amazing Spider-Man series. And although Slott’s continuing on as the new series’ creator guaranteed quality writing, I still missed Doc Ock’s very unique interpretation of superheroism and how to control the evil elements in his city.


From: Superior Spider-Man #8 – Otto can fix this!

As it turns out, this month is my lucky month and Marvel seems to have read my previous blog post (which they would, of course). For there it was, amidst the new comics issues of Wednesday, August 6th: Superior Spider-Man #32! Continue reading

Comics review: Is the Superior Spider-Man really superior?

In case you’re threatening to go totally TLDR on me 😉 , an audio version of this review is available as well! Just scroll right down to the very end of this post, where you’ll find it as a podcast entry for the Spiritblade Underground Podcast. The specific podcast episode that features this review was ‘up’ as of May 3, 2014, which I’ll link to here, but as stated you can also find the isolated review at the bottom of this post – with some background illustrations from the comic!

The Superior Spider-Man is a new series and part of the Marvel Now universe, following right after #700 of the previous volume, The Amazing Spider-Man.

Spider-Man has never been my favorite superhero. The movies with Toby Maguire were kind of okay I guess, but definitely no more than that, although I have to admit I really do like the new movie franchise with Andrew Garfield playing the webslinging hero.

It’s especially the Spidey comics however that were never able to grab me. Whenever I encountered him in other Marvel titles, I found Peter Parker (and his superhero alias) too “teenagey”, often childish even. Frankly to me he bordered on an annoying do-gooder who consistently failed to hold my interest for more than one comic.

I had heard that with the new Marvel Now relaunch/reboot/reimagining (take your pick) there had been a significant change to Spidey: in his new title The Superior Spider-Man it was no longer Peter Parker but his arch-enemy Dr. Octopus who donned the webbed costume!

Now I hadn’t read any issues of the previous title The Amazing Spider-Man except for the Fear Itself tie-in issues, so I didn’t know the origin of this storyline firsthand, but it seemed that Continue reading

Comic tip: Pacific Rim – Tales from Year Zero

Recently I discovered a graphic novel which is kind of a prequel to the Pacific Rim movie, which I thought I’d share with you all for it’s a great read. Pacific Rim – Tales from Year Zero was published in close collaboration with the movie’s creators, which is great: some of its most important characters are in the graphic novel, and of course the Kaiju and Jaeger designs are very recognizable as well. Nevertheless, the writers used background stories to the movie that were never filmed, but were originally created to give more substance to the movie’s universe. Thanks to this graphic novel, much of this unknown extra material is now available to us as well. Continue reading

Valiant’s new Archer and Armstrong

This review is also available as a podcast contribution to Spiritblade Underground podcast, a podcast aimed at christian geeks, available through iTunes or go to The Spirit Blade Underground Podcast Home Page.
Click HERE for my Archer and Armstrong audio review on episode 300 of this podcast, go to 25:18 minutes.
Or click the video below.

It’s been only about two years since I started reading comics, and since it was actually the Green Lantern movie that really got me started, I’ve primarily been a DC Comics girl, with a whiff of Marvel thrown into the mix to add some variety. But lately, with all the relaunches and soft reboots that have been going on at both DC Comics and Marvel, my usual batch of comics have been lacking some important traits that had kept me interested up until that point. Long story short, I ditched a number (but not all) of my usual titles and started looking “elsewhere”. Since I’d been hearing a lot of enthousiastic reports and reviews about “the new Valiant”, a comics publisher that had relaunched as recently as May 2012 under the name Valiant Entertainment, I decided to try some of their titles. Starting with Archer & Armstrong

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Graphic novel: Superman Earth One (vol. 2)

The graphic novel Superman Earth One (vol. 1) was published in 2010 but I only recently discovered it. Oh, how I loved it! Therefore, I was even happier to discover that DC Comics had apparently decided to publish a second volume in 2012, which meant I could get another Earth One Superman fix!


Volume 1 – cover

Superman Earth One – Volume 2 does not disappoint! I guess in great part because its creative team is the same as in Volume 1: acclaimed writer J. Michael Straczynski has teamed up once again with well-known penciller Shane Davis; the inker, colorist and letterer from Volume 1 have stayed on as well. This creates high consistency between the two volumes, both in content and artwork, which adds to a great reader experience.

Story

The story is built beautifully and carefully. We start with Clark, who is Continue reading

Graphic novel: Ravine – high fantasy epic adventure!

When I discovered artist Stjepan Sejic while browsing through his deviantart page last year, I immediately fell in love with his artwork. At the time he was working on graphic novel Ravine, together with well-known and critically acclaimed comic writer Ron Marz.

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